aicomos 2019 aicomos 2019

Conference Sessions

Click on the following links for more detailed information on all of the conference sessions.

1. Heritage of the Air: General Session
2. Plane Stories: Encounters with objects
3. Digital Cultural Heritage: Mediating modern migratory memories of space and time
4. Military and civil aviation: Early developments and links
5. The Modernist movement and aviation: Inspiration and influence
6. Migration and the Heritage of the Air
7. No Highway in the Sky: Can air routes join land and sea examples of cultural exchange?
8. Managing remote heritage: Isolation as an incubator of innovation
9. Barnstorming! Bringing an aircraft to people in a field – or the 1920s revived?
10. Vintage Aircraft Operation
11. Australian Aviation Museums Network Workshop (Invited speakers only)

 

1. Heritage of the Air: General Session

We invite submissions that interpret the broader conference themes of modernism, technology, migration and memory to promote an interdisciplinary conversation around the heritage of the air. The session aims to develop understandings of diverse aviation cultures and present thought-provoking perspectives on flight and life in the air.

We welcome submissions for papers (standard and blitz), and creative responses such as visual displays, film screenings and performances.

Session Convenors: Tracy Ireland and Ashley Harrison
Contact: ashley.harrison@canberra.edu.au

2. Plane Stories: Encounters with objects

For this session, we are calling for creative, dynamic, and short (6-minute long) presentations (verbal, video, performance, etc.) centred on an object associated with Heritage of the Air. We invite participants to share a story concerning the way in which a selected object sheds light on the history, heritage, and/or personal experience of air travel, flying, or flight culture in general. We strongly encourage narratives that are pertinent to the narrator’s experiences and emotions. We encourage use of the first person; and are open to creative forms of story-telling, expression, and performativity. We are seeking stories that speak to encounters arising from professional, personal, or domestic life that have inspired, shocked, pleasured, and/or affected you and/or shaped the wider communities in which you live.

Material culture plays a fundamental and vibrant role in the field of memory studies. ‘Material memories’ and personal recollections are typically intertwined and interpenetrate. This session aims to articulate some of the ways that such entanglements between an object and an individual operate in daily life and on special occasions; and can thereby contribute diverse perspectives on understanding and experiences of Heritage of the Air.

Session Convenors: Steve Brown, Annie Clarke, Sally Brockwell, and Ursula Frederick
Contact: steveb.heritage@gmail.com

3. Digital Cultural Heritage: Mediating modern migratory memories of space and time

There has been significant interest in both digital heritage technologies and cultural routes over recent years. Digital technologies can improve heritage management with condition capture and maintenance systems, enhance interpretation with interactive media, enrich archives with sensory experiences and augment histories with crowdsourced data. Cultural routes can epitomise the nexus between diverse traditions, acknowledge feats of human ingenuity and endurance, and recognise enduring intercultural dialogue across space, time and societies. Yet both developments have been criticised, the former for taking too narrow a view of a rapidly innovating and seductive environment of digital tools, technologies and applications, and the later for failing to adequately articulate the dynamic and continuously evolving nature of cultural routes. Both also provoke questions about authenticity, ownership and value, and both challenge the concept of ‘living heritage’ and the sustainability of heritage values. The junction between the two, however, remains essentially under-explored.

This session welcomes papers that critically explore the multiple implications and theoretical challenges of digital technologies  or the many cultural routes associated with modern migration. The session will focus less on descriptive projects and more on how digital technologies can contribute to heritage debates about cultural routes as a representation of tangible places and intangible practices across space, time and society.

Papers might explore what evidence can be captured using digital technologies and how such evidence might be interrogated, commodified or experienced; how histories of dynamic cultural routes can be researched, interpreted, negotiated and represented; when a cultural route should be protected for future generations and how digital technologies can be used to manage a cultural route sustainably in the present? The aim of this session is to consider the relationship between tangible digital data and intangible historical research, and to theorise the role of digital technologies in the context of modern cultural routes.

Session Convenors: Chris Landorf and Kelly Greenop
Contact: c.landorf@uq.edu.au

4. Military and civil aviation: Early developments and links

Civil aviation in Australia and beyond would not be where it is today without developments and experiences in military heritage. This session aims to explore the history and heritage of Australian aviation through papers exploring links between Australia’s civil and military heritage.

Paper submissions on aircraft, sites, pilots, passengers and experiences are encouraged. Presentations, workshops, films and displays are all welcome.

Session Convenor: Rosemary Hollow
Contact: rosemary.hollow@canberra.edu.au

5. The Modernist movement and aviation: Inspiration and influence

The advent of accessible air travel in the mid-20th century led to increased requirements for new airports, amenities and associated infrastructure.  This session invites presentations on aviation architecture, through the lens of modernism.

How did the modernist movement influence air travel, and vice versa?  How did architects embrace the utilitarian design and functional requirements of airport architecture (i.e. terminals and control towers)? How were designers reimagining uniforms and fashion for travelling? How did connecting countries and cultures contribute (or otherwise) to the globalisation of airport design? How did the effect of overseas travel influence Australian architectural styles?

Session Convenor: : Canberra Modern (Rachel Jackson)
Contact: rachelj@gml.com.au 

6. Migration and the Heritage of the Air

Air travel, airports and the physical fabric of aviation heritage features prominently in the memories of migrants to and from Australia since the post-WWII era. This panel proposes to explore these migration narratives and their intersections with aviation heritage—not only through the memories of migrant arrivals (including oral history testimonies relating encounters with and in airports and air travel) but also through histories of shared and layered cultural landscapes. Regarding the latter, examples are the Department of Immigration camps in postwar Australia, which were often former military training camps or, in the case of Benalla (VIC) and Uranquinty (NSW), RAAF Flying Training Schools. We invite papers that address all these themes, and especially those that attempt to explore the intersections between migrant and military histories of these landscapes, marked as they are by the aviation industry.

Session Convenor: Alexandra Dellios 
Contact:  alexandra.dellios@anu.edu.au

7. No Highway in the Sky: Can air routes join land and sea examples of cultural exchange?

Aviation helped forge a truly international twentieth century.  This session considers the validity of air routes as cultural routes, along with land and sea examples, in the context of current definitions and understandings of global heritage.  The session invites contributions on the evolution of different aviation routes, such as the QANTAS Kangaroo Route, from early flying-boats to the jumbo-jet and beyond.  It will explore the cultural exchanges that flowed from the global migration and mass tourism of the post war boom.  It welcomes reflections on the intangible cultural significance of early air travel through access to both private and public memories.  Diaries, photographs, travel posters, press reports and populist media such as Frank Clunes’ 1948 travelogue High Ho to London and Neville Shute’s 1948 novel, the 1951 film classic No Highway in the Sky can illuminate and record cultural exchange.

Session Convenors: Timothy Hubbard, Sandy Blair and Kirsty Altenburg
Contact:  timothyh@oldstandrews.com.au and sandy.blair@anu.edu.au

8. Managing remote heritage: Isolation as an incubator of innovation

Aviation-related heritage places are, in many cases, distinguished by geographic isolation.  Examples include Australia’s extensive on-ground network of air navigation aids, and the Woomera Testing Range extending deep into the Western Desert.  Technical specialism and security considerations are factors that further impede public access and engagement.  This session explores lessons that might be applied to practice from management regimes developed for isolated and difficult-to-access heritage places. Liberated from economic imperatives and challenged by particular circumstances, heritage practitioners (and others) are free to explore a breadth of approaches, including managed neglect and reconciliation ecology. The intent is to present alternatives to the interventionist impulses of heritage practice and to refresh understandings of the societal ‘role’ that heritage is intended to perform.

Session Convenor: Adam Mornement 
Contact: AMornement@lovellchen.com.au

9. Barnstorming! Bringing an aircraft to people in a field – or the 1920s revived?

Andrew King, a modern barnstorming pilot, and Paul Glenshaw, filmmaker, take a personal look at the activities of modern barnstormers flying just as their forefathers did in the 1920s, but as they do it today. We welcome other reflections on barnstorming past and present!

Session Convenor: James Kightly
Contact: jkightly@yahoo.com.au

10. Vintage Aircraft Operation

The challenge of operating vintage aircraft today – what are the difficulties? Technical & paperwork challenges, regaining lost knowledge. Why do it? Entertainment, commemoration, education – and fun! Calling for submissions from practitioners and participants in the diverse arena of heritage aircraft operation to explore how and why people work hard to put historic aircraft back in the air and keep them there.

Session Convenor: James Kightly
Contact: jkightly@yahoo.com.au

11. Australian Aviation Museums Network Workshop (Invited speakers only)

The purpose of the Workshop will be to review and critique the Final Proposal for a National Aviation Museum Collection across Australia before final submission to the Federal Government. Feedback and evaluation will be sought and considered for inclusion in the Final proposal.

At the Aviation Cultures Conference in 2017 a paper was presented outlining a proposal to build a National Aviation Museum around the significant aircraft held across the whole of Australia by member Museums of the AMNN.

At the 2018 Aviation Cultures this proposal was addressed again in a panel discussion to gauge support for such a proposal. The response was encouraging.

The proposal has now been developed into a full report/submission outlining the proposal in detail and ready for submission to the Federal Government.

Session Convenor: David Byrne 
Contact: david.byrne@amnet.net.au

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